Shirah Vollmer MD

The Musings of Dr. Vollmer

Archive for December 13th, 2016

Marketing Psychoanalysis

Posted by Dr. Vollmer on December 13, 2016

Marketing psychoanalysis used to be an unspoken taboo, meaning that patients were supposed to come and seek our intensive help, rather than clinicians seeking patients to treat. This worked well when the supply of psychoanalysts outstripped the demand. In the 60’s and 70’s, and even in the 80’s most analytic institutes did not allow non-MDs to enter training, thereby limiting the available psychoanalysts. Further, in the 60’s psychoanalysis was a popular treatment modality, particularly in big cities in which it was fashionable to say, “my analyst says….” There was status to having an analyst and there was a sense that as a result of being in analysis, deeper creativity and deeper meaning in life could be obtained. Further, many insurance companies paid for the treatment, so the cost was not a big issue for some, leaving only the large time commitment the major barrier to care. As time marched on, the 90s brought us SSRIs and with that limited insurance coverage for psychotherapy. In the 80s, non-MDs sued the American Psychoanalytic Association for discrimination, and they won, opening the doors to non-MD therapists to enter in psychoanalytic training. Now, we have many more providers and much less demand, creating a situation in which marketing is essential to prevent professional death. Yet, how do we teach marketing when our senior colleagues find marketing offensive, in that it might diminish the √©lite aspect to the field? Marketing gives up the notion that we are a sought after commodity. It makes us be more honest with our environment, which of course, is what psychoanalysis claims to do to help patients. This massive shift in supply and demand is the subject of my class entitled “Building A Psychoanalytic Practice.” As I come to the end of my seminar, I hope to convey that our hard-earned psychoanalytic skills cannot be honed unless we have patients, and we can’t have patients unless we announce to the world what we do. Supply and demand has flipped since psychoanalysis came to America. We either adapt or die. It is that simple.

Posted in Psychoanalysis, Psychotherapy, Teaching Psychoanalysis | 2 Comments »

 
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