Shirah Vollmer MD

The Musings of Dr. Vollmer

“The Question of G-d”

Posted by Dr. Vollmer on January 11, 2013

This book, by Dr. Nicholi, is the basis for Mark St. Germain’s play “Freud’s Last Session,” in which, as per previous post, I will be one of the “Talkback” speakers. In preparation for my début, I have given myself homework to read this book and watch the PBS series of the same title. I have also purchased the script of the play (available for $8.00 on Amazon), that I plan to read after I have done my background exploration.

As I begin this book, I am struck by the following paragraph:

      “None of us can tolerate the notion that our worldview may be based on a false premise and, thus, our whole life headed in the wrong direction. Because of the far-reaching    implications for our lives, we tend to dismiss and contradict arguments for the worldview we reject. I hope each reader will critically assess the arguments of both Freud and Lewis and follow Sir Francis Bacon’s advice to  ‘Read not to contradict….but to weigh and consider.’ ”

Dr. Nicholi concludes this part of the prologue by saying:  “It is my hope that Freud and Lewis can jointly guide us through just such an examination.”

I will continue to post as I read this book, but my first fear is that Dr. Nicholi has made Freud’s view on religion more central to Freud’s contribution than his theories related to the process of mining the unconscious. If lay people walk away from this play thinking that Freud was set to make people atheists than they will miss the point that Freud’s theory on religion fit into a much broader theory of the human mind. One does not have to accept Freud’s ideas about religion to gain from his ideas about self-sabotage and the primacy of one’s parental relationships. Likewise, I suspect that C. S. Lewis has brought us far more than his views on religion. His writings are so prolific that it would be sad to think of him only in these terms.

Maybe this will be my opening statement. I will have less than five minutes to introduce the “Talkback”. I will probably spend hours thinking about those five minutes. Time well spent, meaningfully spent, I should say, given the gravity of this topic.

See also…http:http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/culture/la-et-cm-freud-last-session-santa-monica-20130106,0,4591570.story

7 Responses to ““The Question of G-d””

  1. Ashana M said

    The author doesn’t think much of himself, does he?

    • Ashana M said

      Actually, I was just thinking I’m not sure why he assumes one book will turn anyone’s world upside down to such an extent they’ll dismiss his ideas out of hand. With the amount of information out there, does he really think there’s much his readers haven’t already been exposed to? That particular quote just seemed a bit patronizing.

  2. Shelly said

    If it is your fear that people will only see that the play was about Freud’s ideas about religion instead of his ideas about self-sabotage and the primacy of one’s parental relationships, then it is your role in your 5-minutes of fame during the “Talkback” to dispel these notions. Use them wisely, as you always do.

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