Shirah Vollmer MD

The Musings of Dr. Vollmer

Do Child Psychiatrists Still Play With Kids?

Posted by Dr. Vollmer on April 25, 2012

I have a new job-a volunteer job, that is! On July 12, 2012, I will begin teaching “Clinical Practicum,” which is a six month child psychotherapy course to first year child psychiatry fellows at UCLA. I will have seven students with varying degrees of interest in doing child psychotherapy. “Can I give my students articles to read?” I ask, my new boss. “You can do whatever you want,” she tells me with a smile. I am excited to walk into an environment in which psychopharmacology is the dominant modality, with the hope, that maybe, just maybe, I can remind my students, budding professionals, that listening and explaining are still valuable skills. Maybe, I can encourage play. By that I mean, maybe I can inspire them to play with their patients as a way of getting to know them.

I have a goal, but my question to myself is how best to achieve that goal. We can read and discuss articles. I can talk about my clinical experience, by disguising identifying features in order to preserve privacy.  If I choose that path, should I pick one patient and go into depth about his treatment, or should I discuss vignettes of multiple patients? I can have them bring in their clinical experience, and we can have a group supervision group where we share ideas about how to get into the inner workings of both the child and his/her family. If I have the child psychiatry fellow bring in a case, then should I divide up the 26 weeks among seven fellows so that everyone has an equal opportunity? Should I limit the class to the treatment of pre-pubertal kids, since treating adolescence is a very different skill set? The best path is not clear to me.

I need to connect with them in a way which expands their experience, but does not seem “outdated.”  I fear that they will see the idea that one must  spend a lot of time with a child and his family before plunking down a diagnosis  as “unrealistic.” To help them see that understanding and explaining is a journey contradicts the notion that parents need immediate answers to their concerns about their child. On the other hand, this is a University, so a multiplicity of ideas should be embraced by both students and faculty. I hope that my exploration of different ways to approach this class will be in line with my goal that different approaches all have value. The more one learns, the more tools one can draw upon. This is a simple notion, but even in the most open minded families, I mean institutions, this idea gets lost. Am I too grandiose to think that I can bring back a discussion of family dynamics to a scene which is so heavily based in neurobiology? Or, do I need that grandiosity to enter into this adventure? As always, I welcome your thoughts.

2 Responses to “Do Child Psychiatrists Still Play With Kids?”

  1. Shelly said

    First and foremost, congrats on your new job! Secondly, I think a mesh of all of the methods described above will be interesting to your students and faculty alike. A bit of psychopharmacology, a bit of group supervision, a bit of your presenting your experiences, a bit of reading papaers, etc… should satisfy everyone. As far as the question of whether or not to have your students play with young patients, from my personal experience the answer is a resounding “yes,” — psychiatrists still do play with their patients, but you will have to teach your students how to analyze the details of the play, and that might take more than a course to do. And the discussion of family dynamics that you propose is of course key the understanding of the patient, so that should definitely be included in your course. Way to go, Shirah!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: